Stop collection calls for someone else’s debt

Photo by Chris Potter

Photo by Chris Potter

On of the most frequent consumer complaints received by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau are annoying collection calls for someone else. It’s unclear whether these collectors are intentionally pursuing the wrong person or that they’ve made a mistake. But if you’re getting calls or letters from a collector for someone else’s debt, you probably don’t care why it’s happening, you just want the collection attempts to stop. Here are some suggestions to stop collection calls for someone else.

Collection calls for someone else

If a debt collector is calling or writing you about a debt that you don’t owe, the first thing you should do is tell them very clearly that they have the wrong person and that this is someone else’s debt. Be polite but firm. The collector may ask you to confirm the last four digits of your social security number or a similar personal identifier. While it may be unwise to give the collector your full social security number, there probably isn’t too much risk in giving them  the last four digits to confirm that the debt isn’t yours. The collector may ask you if you know the actual account-holder and how to reach them. While you’re under no obligation to do so, you may consider passing along the other person’s information if you know it.

In addition to verbally telling the collector that it is someone else’s debt, you may consider sending a follow-up letter confirming what you told them. Identify yourself in the letter and then write something like: “you called me on this date at this number. I am not the person who owes this debt. Please stop contacting me.” If you know any details about the account in question, include a reference to those in your letter to be sure the collector can properly identify the account. Send this letter certified mail with a return receipt and keep a copy of the letter and receipt for your records.

You should also keep detailed records of any additional collection attempts after you’ve notified the collector that the debt isn’t yours. Keep track of the time, dates, and duration of any additional calls and save any voice messages. If you think the calls are robocalls, make a note of that and why you think so. Also, keep copies of any letters or other documents that they send you.

It’s also a good idea to check your credit reports to make sure the other person’s debt isn’t listed on your reports. Use Annual Credit Report to get free copies of your credit reports from the three major credit reporting agencies. Once you have the reports, make sure that the other person’s account isn’t showing up on your credit report. If it is, you should send a dispute letter to each of the credit bureaus incorrectly reporting that account. Take a look at this post for more information about how to dispute incorrect information on your credit report.

If you’ve told the debt collector that you are not the right person and continue to get collection calls for someone else, it’s time to talk to a consumer rights attorney to discuss the situation in more detail. In addition to helping you stop the collection attempts, a consumer attorney can advise you whether you have any claims under the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act against the debt collector. If the debt doesn’t belong to you, you’ve told the collector that, and the collector still keeps calling, it deserves to get sued under the FDCPA and be held accountable for harassing an innocent consumer.

Collection lawsuit for a debt that isn’t yours

If you get served with a collection lawsuit for someone else’s debt, you need to take additional steps. You should do everything suggested above, but you also have to submit an answer to the lawsuit. In Minnesota, the answer must be submitted within 20 days. An answer is a formal legal document that responds to each of the allegations in the complaint. If the debt isn’t yours, you should be able to deny most of the allegations in the lawsuit. You should also note somewhere in your answer that the debt is someone else’s. Even if you don’t owe the debt, you have to answer the lawsuit. Failure to respond to the lawsuit will likely result in a default judgment against you. A default judgment can be difficult (and expensive) to overturn, even if the debt isn’t yours. It may also lead to garnishments and other unpleasantness.

Because the consequences of a collection lawsuit are quite serious, you should strongly consider discussing your situation with a consumer lawyer. A consumer lawyer can help you prepare an answer to the lawsuit and also advise you if you have possible counterclaims against the debt collector for pursuing the wrong person.